Erindi in Imagery

erindi

Returning to nature is a grounding experience. Vital. And every so often it’s necessary for humans to feel the dirt beneath their feet again, to breathe the clean air, and to stand in awe of things truly awe-inspiring.

I went to Erindi this past long weekend. This is my story.

Prologue: The road to nowhere

“A man grows most tired while standing still” – Chinese proverb

the road to nowhere

Chapter 1: Hit the road

“We meet no ordinary people in our lives.” – C.S. Lewis

on the road again

Chapter 2: Rock on!

“And I can’t get it on without you. No way!” – The Rockets

the rockets at karibib

the rockets in nam

Chapter 3: The scenic route

Two roads diverged in a wood, and I — I took the one less traveled by, and that has made all the difference.” – Robert Frost

the scenic route

Chapter 4: Welcome to Erindi

“If I had a world of my own, everything would be nonsense. Nothing would be what it is, because everything would be what it isn’t.” – Lewis Carroll

Erindi

Intermission: Life-driven

“Not all those who wander are lost.” – J.R.R. Tolkien

driven

Chapter 5: Carnivores

“This is a ruthless world and one must be ruthless to cope with it.” – Charlie Chaplin

carnivores

Chapter 6: Herbivores

“In a gentle way, you can shake the world.” – Gandhi

herbivores

Chapter 7: The Lone Ranger

“Nothing can bring you peace but yourself.” – Ralph Waldo Emmerson

the lone ranger

Chapter 8: Sunfall and Sunfly

“My sun sets to rise again.” – Robert Browning

sunfall and sunfly

Chapter 9: I saw the signs

“The only source of knowledge is experience” – Albert Einstein

i saw the signs

Chapter 10: When giants walk

“What we do now echoes in eternity” – Marcus Aurelius

giants walk

Epilogue: It was all a blur

“The eyes see only what the mind is prepared to comprehend.” – Henri Bergson

blurry hill blurrylope

The End.

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ZOMBIE

LIMBO_Wayne_Kirton_Writer

zombie in limbo

It was nearly all gone; his memory…

As he was sat on the parquet floor – back against the splattered wall, slumped over and nursing a bite wound in a bloody arm – Daniel Woodman couldn’t help but stare dimly at the family portrait mounted on the wall before him.

It was four years ago – Emma’s first birthday. Dana was stressing herself out as per her usual tall order of “Best Mom Ever!”, proving both to herself and stay-at-home mothers everywhere that overzealous organisation skills serve well beyond the tertiary years.

Dan was on his back on the living room carpet, looking up.

“Who’s a cutie? You are! Yes, you are!”

He was talking to the baby Emma cradled lightly in his upheld hands, looking down at him like innocence incarnate.

Emma laughed, and Dan responded in kind. It was one of those pure and beautiful moments you almost hate to have because it makes you forget that life won’t always be this way.

Here he was, after all, sat on the parquet floor, nursing a bite wound in a bloody arm. It was a Tuesday. Maybe.

arm_bite_close_up_comparison

 “But I don’t want to go among mad people,” Alice remarked.

“Oh, you can’t help that,” said the Cat: “we’re all mad here. I’m mad. You’re mad.”

“How do you know I’m mad?” said Alice.

“You must be,” said the Cat, “or you wouldn’t have come here.”

While lacking the cerebral capacity now to articulate such emotions,

Dan, or what was left of him anyway, had a deep and visceral sense in his gut that this picture on the wall, the video streams in his head like hallucinations and cigarette burns, these people, evoked distinct feelings of *something* within him. He felt the cocktail of laboratory chemicals and viscous saliva course through his veins. The light burned his eyes. He screamed torturously; his already-rotting arm convulsed violently  – clenching and twisting, scraping up the floor, pulling splinters and leaving behind shreds of ripped fingernail. His head jolted side to side like a malfunctioning piece of machinery and even through the epilepsy Dan could sense his legs were entirely lame by now.

The outside chaos of machine gun fire and civilian screams grew thick and Dan found himself drowned out and lost; swirling the drain in delirium.

And yet, somehow, through the void he could hear her… calling out to him. It was faint; blurry at first. But the tone and timbre – the way she played the air like a pained violin – resonated with his soul. He knew her. And then it all came back, piercing through the haze in one brilliant display of desperation:

“DADDY!”

shatter glass

The blackness cracked beneath Dan like a thin sheet of glass and he fell through into the awaiting light below. He threw his head back in surrender as every joyful memory came rushing back and the most lopsided smile cracked like a fault line across his face.

Partial rigor mortis set in and caught the corner of Dan’s mouth, pulling it higher than muscle can go without snapping like sun-perished rubber bands. He felt the pain. In some sense of the word at least. Yet whatever he felt was left wayside to the tranquility he was experiencing deep within his being.

LIMBO_Wayne_Kirton_Writer
“Happiness is a state of mindlessness!” – Those who know

And there it stayed – his twisted, psychotic, serene smile. Dan lingered in limbo for an eternity as his eyes glazed over and his reptilian brain worked through it all:

He remembered… a beautiful baby girl… and how small her hand was, wrapped around his little finger. How sick she was for three weeks with fever and every night he had to pass out beside her because sleep eluded him.

He called out to her, but could feel the deadened sensation of his vocal cords melting and giving way like fishing line above the heat of his distress. His sounds came out garbled and raspy, filled with coughed up phlegm and blood.

It started to taste good.

“Daddy!”

The sobbing broke Emma’s breathing into pieces small enough for her to manage. Dan corkscrewed his head to the side. The sound of grinding bone and snapping twigs complemented its rickety movement well. Dan was barely able to keep his head off his shoulder as his remaining muscles relaxed with his fading consciousness. He could feel his sanity slipping; his grotesque mask still plastered across his once handsome face.

Through the flickering spots of colour, Dan managed to lock eyes with his daughter for what he knew would be the last time.

“Mommy’s asleep! What do I do?”

Dan watched the vignette encroach on his field of vision, the picture of Emma – the most beautiful girl in the world – fading with the light. He tasted metal.

Dan gathered every last scrap of sentience and muddled it together with what faint heart he had left to form one coherent word, screamed as a whisper through layers of bile and with all the love a father can muster: His daughter’s only hope.

“Run!”

Captured Moments

autumn leaves

Autumn Leaves The gentle breeze swept the leaves up in a flurry likely unimpressive to anyone not paying any mind to its profound beauty. Yet they continued to dance around his feet whimsically and without reservation as she nuzzled her shoulder a little more snuggly into his lap. Her legs were outstretched – half of her tucked away cosily, the other half soaked up the warm summer sun. It was a picture-perfect moment – the same thought he had been rolling around his head for the past five minutes.

“Whimsical. Definitely whimsical.” he thought to himself as he mulled for the correct description of the fallen leaves.

As the day inched forward, moments at a time, and with her blissfully unaware of the cogs in turn, he had by now already reconstructed the scene to a great degree of detail via his internal monologue. Everything was perfect. His story was complete. Now it was simply to create it.

“The gentle breeze swept the leaves up in a flurry likely unimpressive to anyone not paying any mind to its profound beauty.”

His fingers etched his words onto his digital slate. She watched television; the moment was gone. Yet he continued to describe it – the arch of the willow reminiscent of her quiet beauty as she rested upon his comfort, he likened the rise and fall of her chest to the ebb and flow of the ocean, and the wind sang songs of her eternity beauty. “I’m running a bath. You joining?” It was late already. He dismissed her casually, missing even with his peripheral view the naked beauty standing behind him, a mere impulse away. She exited the scene, leaving our hero to continue the story of the most wonderfully spent afternoon with the most beautiful girl in the world.

What’s your brand’s story?

What’s your brand’s story? And believe me, every brand has one.

You see, there are two types of brands existent in the world today: managed and unmanaged. Unmanaged brands flap their business image like the untied sail of a ship. So as the winds of perception blow, so the sail draws flat against the current, forever at the mercy of the whims of the external world. A ship lost unto the tide.

Managed brands, on the other hand, understand that only a vessel with a sail strung towards a fixed direction reaches its destination. Maritime analogies aside, the important thing to take away from this is as follows:

Your brand has a story. End of story. Either you are controlling, managing and utilising that story to the greatest benefit of your business, or you are not.

Writing, simply stated, is the art of telling your brand’s story. It’s the difference between “get it done” and “just do it”. It’s the solution to the 06:30 vs. six-thirty conundrum. It dictates whether your customers are interested enough to listen to what you have to say, and whether or not they’ll believe you if they do.

Do I have your attention now?